Digital Diversity

COVID-19 forced the world into lockdown last year, and that changed the way people work. Handshakes are out, facemasks are in, and many in-person meetings have been replaced by Zoom conferences. Even as some head back into the office, Zoom’s gridwork of postage-stamp-sized avatars of friends and colleagues remains a big part of a lot of people’s workdays.

Reengineering Timekeeping

Belgian-based Studio Plankton’s team of 3D artists and animators are skilled at telling brand stories of all sorts. One of their many clients is Ressence, a modern watchmaking start-up that has relied on the studio to transform highly technical specifications into meticulously detailed visuals with clear messaging and contemporary branding since 2015.

What Heartbreak Looks Like

When COVID-19 shut down live-action production last year, unforeseen opportunities opened up for many 3D artists, including Los Angeles-based motion designer Jan Sladecko

Using 3D to Set Renaissance Art in Motion

New York City-based director Saad Moosajee has always found Renaissance art interesting because “it evokes God and seems to have a holy quality whether there are literally angels or just dark, moody figures,” he explains. Even so, it’s an aesthetic he hasn’t found much use for until recently, when Japanese singer-songwriter, Joji, contacted him about directing a music video for “777”, a track from the artist’s latest album, Nectar.

Nick DenBoer and the Art of Weird

Toronto-based director/animator Nick DenBoer has been collaborating with electronic music producer and musician Joel Zimmerman (aka Deadmau5) for years. It’s an odd pairing in some ways—Deadmau5 (pronounced dead mouse) is internationally recognized for his original, well-engineered sound and straight-talking demeanor. DenBoer (aka Smearballs) is known for being uniquely talented at making super weird stuff, including some surreal branding for KFC.